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By submitting your question, you understand and agree: To the Terms and Conditions for use of the site. Do not include any personal information including name, email or other identifying details in your question or question details. An attorney-client relationship is not being established and you are not a prospective client of any attorney who responds to your question. No question, answer, or discussion of any kind facilitated on this site is confidential or legal advice. Questions answered are randomly selected based on general consumer interest and not all are addressed. Questions may display online and be archived by .

Family Law Legal Answers

Family Law Legal Answers
This is longer, and more technical, than can be effectively addressed by email.  As you have perceived, it is extremely dangerous to get involved in substantial real estate (or other monetary deals) with someone married to someone else.  You do not reveal enough about their legal relationship (in mid-divorce proceedings?  Estranged only?  Any paperwork or agreements?) to be certain, but yes, as a precondition to sinking money into such a deal, you should insist on there being a property settlement or equivalent agreement between your boyfriend and his spouse to insulate you from potential claims in their divorce.  It is more complex than can be covered here; you should consult with a qualified family law specialist.  You do not indicate if or why he has not already done such things with his existing spouse, but if he has not, that should be a huge red flag to you.... Read More
This is longer, and more technical, than can be effectively addressed by email.  As you have perceived, it is extremely dangerous to get... Read More
You do not actually ask a substantive question.  For background materials, including a great deal of information about how alimony works, and should work, and analyses that might be helpful, -->
.  For any better guidance, you should schedule a consultation with a family law specialist well-versed in alimony law and policy, and ask specific questions; it could make quite a difference in outcomes to you.... Read More
You do not actually ask a substantive question.  For background materials, including a great deal of information about how alimony works, and... Read More
Keep looking.  There are a lot of lawyers. You might also call the Legal Aid Society of Palm Beach County.  They used to keep a list of attorneys who might be flexible with fees.
Keep looking.  There are a lot of lawyers. You might also call the Legal Aid Society of Palm Beach County.  They used to keep a list of... Read More
I am pleased that you have taken the responsbility for caring for your grandson. Your post did not say for what you are filing: Medicaid, Social Security Disability, etc. I would suggest you consult with either a disability rights advocate or an attorney who handles disability/Social Security cases. They should have experience in this area.... Read More
I am pleased that you have taken the responsbility for caring for your grandson. Your post did not say for what you are filing: Medicaid, Social... Read More

Can a notarized paper stand up in court???

Answered 12 days ago by attorney David B. Mitchell   |   1 Answer   |  Legal Mostics: Family Lawyer
First, your question doesn't say if your son is living with you by a court order or Final Judgment or just an informal arrangement between you and the father.  In any event, be very careful having your son live with the father by written agreement or by informal agreement. If it lasts long enough and is workingwell for your son, it could result in your loss of custody should you request your son's return some time later. However, a properly drawn agreement stating that the arragnement is just for the child's education ONLY can be of great help should the father refuse to return your son. Again, be careful and ALWAYS consult a family law attorney before doing this.... Read More
First, your question doesn't say if your son is living with you by a court order or Final Judgment or just an informal arrangement between you and... Read More
By definition, a Power of Attorney is a legal instrument, which authorizes one to act on behalf of another.  The terms of the POA will set forth the terms and conditions of your authority to act. These documents are usually prepared in anticipation of one being unable to act in his or her interest.  If your Mother's POA sets forth the circumstances under which you are authorized to act, I would suggest escalating the issue to a manager or supervisor, noting your mother's years of faithful service, payment history, etc.   I would highlight the absurdity of the company request in view of your Mother's current mental state.  If your Mother has "dementia," I think it rather unreasonable for them to request that you have her sign and notarize a document in her current state. Perhaps, you may wish to consider contacting a local television station that brings attention to consumer affairs.  Without any knowledge of the terms of the POA, your questions cannot be answered in this forum. Lawyer.com offers general information and not legal advice.   I suggest that you confer with a lawyer in your area to discuss this matter in greater details.  Best of luck... Read More
By definition, a Power of Attorney is a legal instrument, which authorizes one to act on behalf of another.  The terms of the POA will set forth... Read More

how mu;ch does it costs to get a name change down?

Answered 12 days ago by attorney Deborah A. Wilson   |   1 Answer   |  Legal Mostics: Family Lawyer
Your question cannot be answered in this forum.  This site offers general information and not legal advice or price information. Lawyers charge by the hour.  Therefore, the price of a name change will vary depending upon the amount of information that needs to be reviewed, reasons for the name change, whether you are able to meet all of the statutory requirements, etc.  I suggest that you confer with an attorney to discuss this matter in greater details. Best of luck~... Read More
Your question cannot be answered in this forum.  This site offers general information and not legal advice or price information. Lawyers charge... Read More
Your question cannot be answered in this forum.  Lawyer.com offers general information and not legal advice. Due to the complexity of the facts presented, I suggest that you confer with a family lawyer to discuss your case in greater details. Make sure you bring with you to the meeting a copy of all court orders, which set forth the terms of custody and visitation.  The order will define what is permissible and whether the stepmother can take steps to limit your relationship with the child.  Most lawyers charge by the hour and consultation are billed at a lawyer's hourly rate.  Therefore, unless you find a lawyer who is willing to offer a free or reduce consultation (military, elderly, disabled), you need to be prepared to pay for the initial consult.  Best of luck~... Read More
Your question cannot be answered in this forum.  Lawyer.com offers general information and not legal advice. Due to the complexity of the facts... Read More

Married for 5 1/2 years

Answered 13 days ago by attorney Bari Zell Weinberger   |   1 Answer   |  Legal Mostics: Family Lawyer
Thank you for your question.There are many factors to consider when determining whether an award of alimony is warranted, and if warranted, the duration and amount of same.  The duration of the marriage and your financial circumstances are only two factors.  You may be able to negotiate the retroactive support that you provided; however, I will not be able to give you a more definitive answer without knowing more about your case.  For example, what is the need for alimony? What was the standard of living established during your marriage?  These are just a few more factors that are used when determining alimony.  I strongly encourage you to schedule a consultation with an experienced family law attorney. I hope this information was helpful to you.... Read More
Thank you for your question.There are many factors to consider when determining whether an award of alimony is warranted, and if warranted, the... Read More
You need to file for divorce. From the moment he is served with divorce papers, he (or his niece/ attorney in fact) is not allowed to dissipate marital assets, which would include mortgaging your property. Until then you need to protect your half of any joint liquid assets you still hold together with him by withdrawing it and creating a separate account for yourself. As for the rest, it is very unclear and more information is needed.  ... Read More
You need to file for divorce. From the moment he is served with divorce papers, he (or his niece/ attorney in fact) is not allowed to dissipate... Read More




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